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Brush up on Your Engineering Terms

Posted: December 17, 2018

Attention engineers!

Are you looking for a new, more challenging, more financially rewarding or more exciting job, especially in aerospace and related fields? TeamGlobal is the premier aerospace staffing agency and has been for more than a quarter of a century.

If you know exactly where you want your career path to lead you, we can help you find the position that will help take you there. Or, if you're in more of an exploratory mode, we can help you figure out how best to make use of your engineering talents and expertise. No matter what field you excel in — from design and operations to maintenance and modification — TeamGlobal can match you with employers who are committed to helping you add to your repertoire of skills.

TeamGlobal has a long, distinguished history of matching up professional engineers and technicians with engineering, aerospace, and tech firms. That success has helped us earn the respect of companies around the globe. In fact, TeamGlobal is the first agency that major airlines, defense contractors, aircraft and spacecraft manufacturers, and other leading tech firms contact to meet their staffing needs.

To help you make yourself the most attractive possible candidate for top companies looking to hire top engineering talent, it may be worth taking a refresher course on some key engineering vocabulary. Some of these terms cover key concepts, while others are ones you're likely to encounter while browsing job descriptions and current openings.


  1. Angle of Attack
  2. In aeronautics, the angle formed by the wing chord line and the relative wind.

  3. Aspect Ratio
  4. In aeronautics, the relationship between the length and width of a wing.

  5. Assembler
  6. An assembler has three primary responsibilities. They study blueprint specifications and assembly instructions, gather the parts, materials, tools and sub-assemblies required, and then position them.

  7. Boundary Layer
  8. This aviation-specific term refers to the thin layer of air next to the surface of an airfoil which, due to the air's viscosity, causes a reduction in speed.

  9. Control Systems
  10. Control systems engineers design tools for the automated regulation of dynamic processes. Most control systems employ sensors and other electrical (or computerized) components that measure outputs, creating data that can be fed back into the system to optimize performance.

  11. Database Administrator
  12. A database administrator is responsible for the security, integrity, development and performance of databases. Moreover, individuals who fill these roles guarantee that users have access not only to the information contained in the database but that they also have access to it in a manner that is useful to them.

  13. Dihedral
  14. This term describes a method of mounting the wings of an aircraft so that the wing-root is lower than the wingtips.

  15. Electro-mechanical Engineer
  16. A professional who brings together the principles of mechanical engineering and electrical engineering to conceptualize, build and modify devices, machines and other equipment that makes use of such technologies is known as an electro-mechanical engineer.

  17. Empennage
  18. Empennage refers to the elevators, rudders, vertical and horizontal stabilizers and other components which make up an aircraft's tail assembly.

  19. Heuristic Method
  20. By making approximations and testing them in real-world scenarios, engineers seek to arrive at solutions to specific problems. Sometimes known as "trial and error," the heuristic method can be extremely useful when attempting to achieve a desirable rather than an ideal outcome.

  21. High Hypersonic
  22. An airspeed that falls anywhere between Mach 10 and Mach 25 is known as high hypersonic speed.

  23. Manufacturing Engineer
  24. A manufacturing engineer is an engineer who designs, develops and conducts programs to evaluate manufacturing processes.

  25. Network Engineer
  26. A network engineer is an engineer who sets up, develops, troubleshoots and maintains computer networks within or among organizations as well as for other users of those networks.

  27. Reynolds Number
  28. The Reynolds number is the ratio of inertial forces to viscous forces.

  29. Signal-To-Noise Ratio (SNR)
  30. The strength of an information-carrying signal, electrical or otherwise, relative to interference is known as the signal-to-noise ratio, often abbreviated SNR. Traditionally expressed in decibels, SNR applies to any system in which engineers must ensure that what is meaningful is readily distinguishable from what is irrelevant or extraneous.

In addition to these 15 terms, check out this great list of "20 Useful Vocabulary Words for an Engineering Resume" created by the Converse International School of Languages in California.

Of course, these are just a few (and a very few at that) of the engineering terms with which you should be familiar as you look for your next job in the field. The engineering job market is as competitive as it has ever been. Give yourself an advantage by working with a staffing service that has extensive experience matching engineering firms’ needs with the highly skilled individuals who can meet those needs. Let TeamGlobal help you find and get that dream job you have always wanted — and deserve. Start your search today.

What To Do with Your Engineering Degree

Posted: December 14, 2018

Wondering what to do with your engineering degree?

Not sure where all of those years of study and hard work can take you? Let TeamGlobal help you understand your options and broaden your horizons. For more than a quarter of a century, TeamGlobal has helped engineers optimize their skill sets by matching them with the career opportunities of their dreams.

As the world's premier engineering staffing agency, TeamGlobal is on the leading edge of developments in the field. We know which companies both around the corner and around the world are looking to hire, and we understand which specializations and credentials are most marketable. Because we're among the first to know when desirable engineering vacancies open up, we're not only able to quickly place top talent, but also to help our job-seekers negotiate the lucrative engineering yearly salaries they merit.

Let TeamGlobal walk you through the steps you need to take to land the engineering job you've always wanted and that you've spent your career preparing to move into. Engineering is a broad field, and engineers work with a diverse array of materials, processes, and technologies. From aerospace and aeronautics to software, your engineering degree qualifies you for any number of exciting opportunities across multiple industries. And, at TeamGlobal, our clients are looking to fill many types of vacancies and technical service job openings.

Here are just a few of these engineering examples.

  • Avionics Engineer. Vital personnel in any aeronautics or aerospace organization, avionics engineers design, develop and test the crucial electronic instruments that are fitted to aircraft and spacecraft.
  • Cost Schedule Analysts.
  • Database Administrator.
  • Design Engineer. These specialists develop and design new products or components, as well as the systems necessary for their production. Design engineers often also review existing products and components, identifying opportunities for more efficient production and enhanced performance.
  • Electrical Engineer. Everything from telecommunications systems to power grids to automobiles relies upon electrical devices and systems. Electrical engineers design these devices and develop these systems, regularly testing them to prevent their failure.
  • Electro-Mechanical Engineer. Any product or system that incorporates both electrical components, such as integrated circuits, and mechanical functionality, such as a motor, requires the expertise of an electro-mechanical engineer.
  • Flight Test Engineer. If you have experience or a keen interest in prototyping and benchmarking, you might be ideally suited to a position in flight test engineering.
  • Graphic Designer/Illustrator.
  • Information Technology (IT) Engineer. If you have a strong interest in computers, computational systems, cybersecurity, and/or computer networks, you may be ideally suited to a position in IT engineering. These individuals also work to integrate hardware and software to ensure the smooth functioning of computerized systems.
  • Integration Analyst.
  • Logistics Specialist.
  • Manufacturing Engineer. These individuals apply the principles of the engineering sciences to manufacturing processes, operations, and protocols. Manufacturing engineers thus influence everything from supply chain management to quality control.
  • Manager.
  • Network Engineer. A further specialization within the IT engineering field, network engineering focuses on the connections between computer equipment that enable efficient communications, whether they be textual, verbal (voice), visual (video) or algorithmic (data-based) in nature.
  • Quality Engineer. Individuals in this role create the processes and instruments necessary to assure desired outcomes. In manufacturing, that could entail making sure that products meet standardized measures of appearance as well as performance. In other industries, quality engineers may be tasked with managing human resources.
  • Simulation Engineer. Simulations engineers design and develop computer simulation solutions in which the functionality, durability, and safety of vital components can be modeled and experimented with in a virtual environment.
  • Stress Engineer. Focusing on the materials used in aeronautics and aerospace applications, stress engineers are responsible for making sure those materials can withstand the extreme conditions (speeds, temperatures, etc.) to which they will be subjected in everyday, real-world scenarios.
  • Subsystems Engineer. Systems can be complex. They are often hierarchical and full of both interoperable and dependent subsystems. Individuals who work in this role design, develop and perform quality assurance on these subsystems.
  • Technical Writer.
  • Tool Design Engineer. Tool design engineers make the things that are necessary for making. Much like design engineers, they must be experts in efficiency, ergonomics and universal (or industry-wide) standards.
  • Wire Harness Engineer. Behind every functioning electrical system is a system of wires or cables. These physical components must also be designed, developed, implemented and integrated with other systems. This is especially true in the aerospace field. Wire harness engineers have this expertise.

As you can see, no matter what type of engineer you are, or the engineering types that interest you, TeamGlobal can help find a rewarding job in the field. Our comprehensive approach also means we can help professionals who also value flexibility and work-life balance. Are you looking for a direct hire or a temporary position that may lead to a full-time job? Would you rather find a temporary assignment that allows you to feel your way around an industry or a company? Are you most interested in exploring the engineering zones and the different kinds of engineering work you might want to build a career around? Whatever your goals and aspirations, TeamGlobal can show you the steps you need to take to reach. Moreover, we'll be with you every step of the way, identifying the job openings, helping you craft the perfect resume, preparing you for the interview process and, finally, strategizing with you when the time comes to negotiate a salary.

Whether your degree is in chemical, computer, electrical or mechanical engineering, if you’re looking to advance in your career, contact a TeamGlobal recruiter today!

Novume Executes Definitive Agreement to Acquire OpenALPR Technology, Inc.


Novume Executes Definitive Agreement to Acquire OpenALPR Technology, Inc.


CHANTILLY, VA / ACCESSWIRE / November 15, 2018 / Novume Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ:NVMM), a holding company of leading specialty professional services and technology firms, announced today that it has executed a definitive agreement to acquire OpenALPR Technology, Inc. (OpenALPR). As part of the agreement and upon closing, OpenALPR founder and Chief Executive Officer, Matt Hill, will join Novume as Chief Science Officer.

The anticipated acquisition comes during a period of tremendous growth for OpenALPR, an internationally recognized leading provider of license place reader (LPR) software used by both law enforcement and commercial clients. OpenALPR's proprietary AI-powered LPR solution is currently running on over 3,000 cameras, capturing millions of license plates per day, that are operated by more than 400 clients, including several Fortune 100 companies. Novume currently provides support to OpenALPR through a management services agreement.

"We are excited to take the next step toward completing our acquisition of OpenALPR," said Robert A. Berman, Novume's CEO. "Matt Hill has created a powerful tool that has remarkable potential on its own. Novume has already built an exciting line of products around OpenALPR and we look forward to expanding its use into other areas of the company. As Chief Science Officer, Matt will be at the center of this innovation. OpenALPR has provided a disruptive and cost-effective software solution to the typical capital-intensive need of replacing hardware. It saves money, it saves time, and with an accuracy rate of 99%, it outperforms humans. OpenALPR is truly a game-changer."

Rather than buying expensive special-use cameras that take weeks or months to ship and install, OpenALPR provides software that can be used immediately with any existing IP camera. It can bring customers not just savings of thousands of dollars per camera, but flexibility to expand or decrease usage as needed without large additional capital expenditures. It also can be used to significantly enhance surveillance activity, collecting data such as make, model, and color of a vehicle with the same camera that's being used for general surveillance recording.

"This is an exciting time for OpenALPR, as we join with Novume in disrupting the vehicle recognition market," said Hill. "We see an incredible opportunity to grow our customer-base through Novume's existing relationships in the federal and law enforcement sectors, as well as to support other technologies they bring to market."

OpenALPR's technology is also a natural fit for Novume's line of automatic traffic safety enforcement cameras, which are currently in use or being tested by law enforcement agencies and cities across the U.S. and Canada, including a current pilot program in Cleveland, Ohio.


About Novume Solutions, Inc

Novume provides products and services to both government and private sector clients, with an emphasis on public safety, risk management and workforce solutions. We are a holding company that integrates technology and human capital to solve complex client challenges in today's world. We provide Solutions for a New Generation. For more information, please visit novume.com, or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook.


Forward-Looking Statements

This press release includes statements concerning Novume Solutions, Inc. and its future expectations, plans and prospects that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For this purpose, any statements that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as "may," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "could," "intends," "target," "projects," "contemplates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential," or "continue," by the negative of these terms or by other similar expressions. You are cautioned that such statements are subject to many risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events, or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks that actual circumstances, events or results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, particularly as a result of various risks and other factors identified in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date on which they were made and are based on management's assumptions and estimates as of such date. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of the receipt of new information, the occurrence of future events, or otherwise.


Media Contact:
Matthew Bretzius
FischTank Marketing and PR
matt@fischtankpr.com

Investor Contact:
Robert A Berman
Novume Solutions
ir@novume.com


Source: Novume Solutions, Inc.

Novume Announces Third Quarter 2018 Financial Results

Chantilly, VA – November 13, 2018 - Novume Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ: NVMM), a holding company of leading specialty professional services and technology firms, announced today financial results for the third quarter ended September 30, 2018.

“2018 is the first year in which we have been able to release consolidated results for all the companies currently in the Novume group. We are encouraged by the continued quarter-over-quarter increases in our top-line revenue and reductions in our net loss, and are particularly pleased with the progress Brekford has made in expanding its product lines and areas of business,” said Robert A. Berman, President and Chief Executive Officer.


    Operating Results Highlights

  • Third consecutive quarter of increasing revenue.
  • Third consecutive quarter of decreasing net loss.
  • Management has determined that the substantial doubt regarding Novume’s ability to continue as a growing concern, as reported in the Company’s Form 10-Q for the second quarter of 2018, has been alleviated.

The Company’s financial results are more fully described in its quarterly report on Form 10-Q, which will be filed with the SEC today. Total revenue for the quarter ended September 30, 2018 increased to $13.1 million compared to $4.4 million for the same period in 2017. While the increase from 2017 is primarily due to the acquisition of several subsidiaries, this increase represents the third consecutive quarter of consolidated revenue growth.

Net loss for the quarter ended September 30, 2018 decreased from $0.8 million to $0.5 million for the same period in 2017, and represents a decrease in net loss margin from 17.9% to 3.8% for the comparable period. The decrease in net loss compared to the prior year period was attributable primarily to the accretive gross profit of acquisitions as well as reduced selling, general and administrative expenses due to fewer corporate initiatives offset somewhat by increased interest costs. The decrease in net loss for the third quarter of 2018 represents the third consecutive quarter-overquarter of reducing net loss.

Management has determined that the substantial doubt regarding Novume’s ability to continue as a growing concern, as reported in the Company’s Form 10-Q for the second quarter of 2018, has been alleviated as a result of improved operations, the extended maturity dates on notes payable and the proceeds of its November stock issuance.

“We are also pleased with progress we have made in positioning the Company for future growth,” Berman continued. “In addition to signing a management services agreement with OpenALPR and our announced plan to acquire that company, our existing subsidiaries have been working to improve efficiency and expand their areas of operations. Since the end of the third quarter, Brekford has completed a number of products in the Argos line including: 1) the Argos Guardian, which supports compliance with “move over” laws; 2) the Argos Finder, which is a fully functional portable ALPR unit; and 3) the Argos Edge, an adapter which allows integration for any fixed IP camera to work with OpenALPR software. Field testing for Argos Guardian has been completed and the first Argos Finder orders have been filled. In addition, Brekford has signed a contract with ParkSmart, Inc. for licensing Brekford’s IP360 system as a software solution for the parking enforcement industry in Canada. This is an exciting expansion of the application of the software and reaffirms our belief in Brekford’s potential.”


About Novume Solutions, Inc

Novume provides products and services to both government and private sector clients, with an emphasis on public safety, risk management and workforce solutions. We are a holding company that integrates technology and human capital to solve complex client challenges in today's world. We provide Solutions for a New Generation. For more information, please visit novume.com, or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn, or Facebook.


Forward-Looking Statements

This press release includes statements concerning Novume Solutions, Inc. and its future expectations, plans and prospects that constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For this purpose, any statements that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as ”may,” ”should,” ”expects,” ”plans,” ”anticipates,” ”could,” ”intends,” ”target,” ”projects,” ”contemplates,” ”believes,” ”estimates,” ”predicts,” ”potential,” or ”continue,” by the negative of these terms or by other similar expressions. You are cautioned that such statements are subject to many risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events, or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks that actual circumstances, events or results may differ materially from those projected in the forwardlooking statements, particularly as a result of various risks and other factors identified in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date on which they were made and are based on management’s assumptions and estimates as of such date. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of the receipt of new information, the occurrence of future events, or otherwise.


Media Contact:
Matthew Bretzius
FischTank Marketing and PR
matt@fischtankpr.com

Investor Contact:
Robert A Berman
Novume Solutions
ir@novume.com

Top Engineering Interview Questions

Posted: October 18, 2018

Are you still searching for your dream job in your engineering discipline? Here at TeamGlobal, our staffing experts can help. For more than 30 years, we have met the staffing needs of some of the biggest and most important companies in the aviation and aerospace industries. TeamGlobal can match you up with the perfect job, but we don't stop there. We don't just help you get that key interview. We help you prepare for it.

The interview is where the deal is sealed. Yet so many engineers who impress on paper fumble and falter when they get to the interview. Why? Because they aren't prepared. When you design or build a program or a product, you start by doing research. You need to know what the deliverable is intended to do and what the company, client or end-user wants from the experience of using it.

An interview is no different — only you are the product. You need to know the precise nature of the job for which you are applying, but you also need to consider what the employer expects from their new hires. Those expectations will shape the questions you will be asked.

You are going to have to answer many questions in your engineering job interview. Some of them will be tough and cannot be answered adequately with a "just winging it" approach. Here's how to set yourself up for success.


Never go into an interview cold

Whether they are talking to potential engineering technician hires, software engineers or candidates for positions in engineering management, interviewers are going to ask a lot of questions to determine why they should — or should not — recommend you to the next decision-maker or tender the job offer themselves. To help you prepare for that interview, we at TeamGlobal have put together a list of some of the questions most frequently asked of engineers by interviewers. Only you can provide the answers. Just don't try to improvise or bluff your way through them. Know what you are going to say ahead of time. Have your answers ready, practice them and go into your interview with the kind of confidence that only comes from being prepared.


"What got you into engineering in the first place? And this engineering discipline in particular?"

Companies want employees who are dedicated, committed and passionate about what they do. For most engineers — at least the most successful ones — theirs is not a job or even a career. It is a calling. Many engineers entered their field because they felt compelled to create something or improve an existing device. Others have come to the profession because they have a lifelong fascination with designing, coding, building or improving upon something. Only you know why you are an engineer. Be ready to tell that story.


"What, in your opinion, makes for a good engineer (and specifically in your discipline)?"

Here, the interviewer is actually asking you to give some indication of your core values — your character. Think of someone who was a role model (e.g., an exemplary supervisor, teacher or co-worker), how they inspired you, and how you have tried to emulate them.


"Do you have any special skills or accomplishments that would make you right for this job?"

The intent here is to uncover whether you have been keeping up with current developments and advancements in technology and procedures. Be enthusiastic and don't worry about coming off as arrogant. Jump in and tell the interviewer what you have done, how you have proven yourself, and how you continue to invest in your education and professional development, both formally (e.g., through classes) and informally. Expand both on your skills and your willingness to learn and to improve on those skills.


"What are your strengths? What are your weaknesses?"

The interviewer has read your resume. What he or she is looking for is some self-awareness. They also want to get a sense of how committed you are to becoming a better engineer — and a better employee overall. This is not a podium or confessional, so do not praise yourself to the high heavens or berate yourself for your perceived failures. Everyone has room for improvement in some area. Communicate to the interviewer that you are someone who only looks backward to see how they can better move forward.


"What are your outside interests?"

Interviewers like well-rounded candidates. They prefer candidates who have a life outside of work, especially if they contribute to the community or are passionate about something besides work. This is not, however, an invitation to go on a long tangent about your hobbies or other interests. Answer the question, but do not dwell on it. After all, you are looking for a job, not a new best friend.


"Where do you see yourself five or ten years from now?"

Here, the interviewer is trying to determine is if you have ambition, are willing to take on more responsibility and are willing to make a commitment. Only you can answer this, but the interview chair is not the place to figure that out. Put some thought into this long before you go in for the interview, and, above all, be honest and positive.


"Why did you leave (or why are you looking to leave) your current job?"

This question can be construed as a kind of trap. If you start bad-mouthing your current (or previous) employer or seem desperate for a job, then the interview is likely to be over before it even begins. Have an upbeat, forward-looking answer prepared. Speak to your desire to be challenged, to learn and grow and be a part of something. Be honest, but above all be positive.


"What kinds of problems do you or did you have to solve in your last (or current) job?"

The interviewer is trying to gauge how you respond under pressure. Depending upon the nature of the job itself, they may also need to assess how inventive or creative you are — how you handle and solve problems. They also want evidence of your being a team player. Discuss the challenges you have met and overcome, and give credit where credit is due. Focus on outcomes and what worked; don't get bogged down in process.


"Have you ever had any difficulties working with or for someone, or with a client? How did you handle that situation?"

Interviewers want people who can work under pressure, cope with adversity and overcome obstacles to getting the job done. They prefer to hire people who work well with others — or who at least listen to others. Engineering projects are incredibly complex affairs. Tracking down the source of an issue or finding efficiencies without diluting the quality of the final product requires employees with strong problem-solving skills. Recount your experience in this arena, keeping it high-level. If you cannot think of a specific example or don't have one that fits the bill for the job itself, be prepared to discuss how you would approach such a situation.


"What can you do for us — and what are you looking to get from us?"

This is where you have to have done your research. You need to know what the company does, why they do it, what their future planning encompasses and whether or not they face any specific issues or challenges to achieving their goals. You know your history, your skills and your accomplishments. Where possible, point out what you can bring to the table to meet their needs — and if you have met similar needs for a current or previous employer, expound upon that.

As for the second part of this question, the interviewer knows that any job is a two-way street. If they haven't given you the opportunity already, talk about how you want to learn, grow and be a part of something special. If they think you are there just for a bigger paycheck, chances are you will never see it.


One last thing: ATTITUDE

When you go in for your interview, be pleasant, polite and positive. Also, be honest. Don't pretend you know something if you don't, as a practiced interviewer can spot a phony, a liar or a blowhard right away. Don't put on airs, play a role or embellish your resume.

Finally, be willing to ask your own questions. Interviewers tend to respond positively to candidates who take an active interest in their company, its products, services, history and culture. Show them upfront that you are already thinking about how you can do the job for which you are applying — that you are ready to hit the ground running and to make a valuable contribution.

Whether you are interviewing for an engineering technician job, a position in engineering software, or work in an engineering-related field, chances are you face some stiff competition from other highly skilled candidates. Give yourself an advantage on the engineering and aerospace job markets by working with a staffing service that has extensive experience matching engineering firms’ needs with the right hires. At TeamGlobal, we’ve been doing just that for 30 years. So let us help you apply and successfully interview for your dream engineering job. Contact a TeamGlobal recruiter today.

How to Format Your Engineering Resume

Posted: October 18, 2018

For nearly 30 years, TeamGlobal has provided expert staffing services to many of the top engineering firms in the world. We have a long and successful record of putting the right people in the right job — and of finding the right job for the right people. At TeamGlobal, we understand that before you can seal the deal with that job interview, you first have to craft the kind of resume that will get you that interview, or at least put you on the path to being interviewed.

The key term here is "craft," and that entails making sure that your resume follows industry standards and best practices. Read on to learn more about what that means for you and your engineering job search.


What is an engineering resume designed to accomplish?

Anyone in any of the engineering disciplines knows that if they are asked to design or build something, they first need to know what that something is supposed to do. A resume, like a machine or a piece of equipment that helps make that machine work, is no different.

A resume is a marketing tool — an advertisement — not a recipe for a cake or a technical manual on how to build a device. It is a glimpse, a movie trailer, a teaser meant to spark someone's interest. A resume is not meant to get you a job. It isn't even necessarily meant to get you an interview (although it might if your resume identifies you as a strong fit for the kind of employee a company is looking for).

Rather, a resume is meant to spark an employer's interest in you, so that they will come back to you seeking more information, and then call you in for that all-important interview.


Short, sweet, to the point

No matter what kind of job or position in the engineering field you're applying for, your resume should not be longer than a single page. But that doesn't mean you should or have to cram everything about yourself and your work experience onto that single page. On the contrary, your resume should be easy to read at a glance. Why? Because a glance might be all it gets.


All about you in (at most) a 30 second-read

Most people who read resumes have to work through large stacks of these documents. They can rarely devote more than 30 seconds to each resume presented to them. That means scanning, not reading.

If your resume does not grab an employer's attention right away, they might not even give your resume the full 30 seconds, putting you out of the running before you've even had a chance to show off your talents, skills and abilities.

For that reason, your resume should focus on and draw attention to your strong suits. Think of these as headlines, much like the ones familiar from news stories.

  • Your education
  • Your relevant work experience
  • Your unique accomplishments

If you can grab attention before the skimmer moves on to the next resume, you can then convince them that they need to keep reading.


Things to put into an engineering resume

Whichever of the engineering disciplines or engineering fields you work in, what makes a worthy candidate from an employer's perspective comes down to a few key attributes.

First, an employer needs to know where you went to school, what kind of an engineering program you were enrolled in and what kind of an engineering degree you earned.

Secondly, an employer needs to know which engineering companies you've worked for (and what kind of engineering firms they are, if not evident in the name).

Finally, an employer needs to know what you contributed to the companies where you've worked. If you were recognized for your accomplishments or achieved something noteworthy, this is the place to highlight that. Don’t worry about describing your responsibilities in the finest possible detail. Instead, let the prospective employer know that, as detail-oriented as you are, you also understand the big picture and appreciate how your work creates (and adds) value.


Academic history, work experience and technical skills

Your resume also needs to be functional. That means you need to include key components and configure them correctly, all with an eye to how they interact.

At the very top of your resume, list your complete contact information: your name, street address, telephone number and email address. As for the body of the resume, start with your academic background. This should include all your awarded degrees and certifications, listed in reverse chronological order, i.e., most recent — often also your highest degree earned — first. If you have an advanced degree, graduated with honors or have some other worthy academic accomplishments to note, include themas well.

Next, list your unique skills, e.g., equipment with which you are familiar, programming languages you have mastered, etc. If you took any courses which are relevant to the position you are applying for, or worked on or completed any projects that mark you as particularly qualified, state as much here.

Finally, elaborate on work experience, starting with your current or most recent job and working backward from there. After that, you can list any volunteer work you do or professional activities, in which you participate, or other interests or accomplishments which reflect well upon your character. After all, engineers are people, too, and employers like to know what kind of person they might soon be calling a colleague.


Write like you are talking to an engineer: keywords are the key

People who hire engineers are usually engineers themselves. They know the jargon. They speak your language, and you should let them know you speak theirs. They don't want a lot of flowery prose – they want things clean, clear and to the point, and expressed using the vocabulary they understand.

Look for keywords about the job or the company, and incorporate those same keywords in your resume. If the employer is looking for someone with a background in engineering mechanics, for example, describe your qualifications in engineering mechanics. The same goes for engineering project management, engineering principles, engineering quality control, engineering quality assurance, engineering optimization and engineering management. Many large companies receive so many resumes that they first use a computer algorithm to scan them. Resumes including the right keywords move to the next stage. Those without them are passed over.


Customize the resume for the position

More than anyone else, engineers know that one size does not fit all. When you write a resume for a particular job, you need to retool your resume to address that particular job. That means you have to know as much as possible about the company, their mission and their culture — why they do what they do and what they need you to be able to do to make a valuable contribution to the company. That means doing your homework. Just as you would research a task at hand before working at it, so should you do your due diligence on the position for which you are applying. Start at the company's website, then dip into LinkedIn to learn more about the company's leadership.


Keep it positive

An engineering resume has to be positive. It has to present you in your very best light. A resume is not the place to talk about how things went wrong at your last job, or why you left or are seeking to leave your current position. Above all never, ever bad-mouth a previous employer. Employers want upbeat, purpose-driven, accomplished “can-do” workers. That goes for engineering administrators and engineering managers as well as hands-on engineers.


Presentation can make a huge difference

While some companies still want resumes on paper and delivered by mail, more and more expect to receive them electronically. If you are sending a resume through the mail, use high-quality paper, preferably good stationary complete with letterhead. Seal your resume in a large envelope so it comes out nice and clean and flat – not creased.

Remember, however, that while you want to catch an employer's eye, you do not want to give them eyestrain. Keep your resume clean, clear and easy to read. That means keeping the italics, bold type, fancy fonts and all-caps to a minimum. Use color selectively, say, to highlight key pieces of information. Finally, print out your resume so you can see how it looks both on screen and on paper.


Proof. Proof. Proof.

Proofread your resume – and not just once. Even better, have someone else proof it as well. A single typo or mistake in grammar can doom a resume. An employer may determine that, if you aren't capable of crafting a proper, problem-free resume, your attention to detail may be lacking. And engineers need to be meticulous.

The engineering job market is as competitive as it has ever been. Give yourself an advantage by working with a staffing service that has extensive experience matching engineering firms’ needs with the highly skilled individuals who can meet those needs. At TeamGlobal, we’ve been doing just that for three decades and counting. We also know that finding your dream job in engineering is a process that starts with your resume. Don't go at it alone — begin your engineering job search with TeamGlobal today.

Ace Your Engineering Career Cover Letter!

Posted: September 26, 2018

No matter the field or industry, a first impression is often the only impression anyone looking for a job gets to make with a prospective employer. Luckily, a good cover letter can make an equally good impression. (A poor one can make either a bad impression or no impression at all, neither of which is likely to land you an interview.) As a premier contract and direct hire staffing service for the aerospace industry, TeamGlobalknows what engineering firms are looking for in this all-important document. With our help, you, too, can ace your engineering career cover letter.

Engineers looking to move up in the world and find their dream job need more than just a good education and impressive work experience. They need to know how to present themselves on paper. The cover letter to their resume is the first (and too often only) look a prospective employer will take. That means those engineers who craft a highly professional and engaging cover letter are the ones most likely to get the interview, not to mention the job. Because TeamGlobal has been helping engineering firms meet their staffing needs for over a quarter of a century, we know what applicants like you need both to include and to avoid when presenting yourself in a cover letter. Here are just a few tips we like to share with the talent we place.


Keep it short and to the point

People who have to work their way through a pile of resumes are like shoppers. You need to grab their attention and give them just enough information to make them want to ask you for more. An engineering cover letter should never be longer than a single page. If you can’t pique a decision-maker’s interest in 250 words, chances are you won’t be able to do so in 500. Most HR staff facing the prospect of reviewing hundreds of resumes will only glance at or skim read the first page of a cover letter anyway. If they have to turn the page, they'll usually just turn to the next applicant's letter — and forget yours.


Follow this Tried and True Schematic

An engineering cover letter needs to be short and concise, but it also needs to hit three key points. Engineers know how to construct and follow a schematic drawing, and what to look for when doing so. The people who read cover letters for positions in the engineering fields are the same. They want to read one that follows a well-articulated, legible schematic and often will ignore one that does not. There are three things they are looking for, which means that a solid cover letter for a job in the engineering field should contain these key elements:

  1. Why you want this position.
  2. Why you are qualified for this position.
  3. Why the company should interview you.

Research the company as well as the job

Before you can tell a prospective employer why you want a position with their company, you need to know more about what that company does, how it operates and what they are expecting from their hires. Visit their website, of course, but then go beyond. Look for information on the company at Glassdoor and in trade publications covering both the business and engineering sectors.

Your goal is to gain more insight into how your prospective employer deals with its customers, clients, employees and the general public. Take note of how the company presents itself to the world. Look for clues and take your cue from their corporate culture. When you do express your interest in the position, demonstrate that you have an appreciation for the company’s mission, vision and values. Just be brief about it — a single, well-phrased sentence that gets straight to the point is all you need or want.


Show you’re the right person for the job

When you find out what an engineering firm is looking for in a new or replacement hire, show them you are not only qualified to do the job but are also the perfect fit for it. Craft a short, simple, straightforward list of your work experience and match it as closely as possible to their published job description. Show them how you can fulfill their needs. Doing so means summarizing your professional background (summarize being the key word here), then briefly describing what you accomplished in your previous positions. Finally, list your skills. Don’t limit yourself to the technical here. Sharing any relevant soft skills can help differentiate you from applicants who are only able to tick the job description’s boxes. Plus, if you want to earn an engineer manager salary, you’ll need to offer evidence that you’ve already proven yourself as an engineer manager.


Bring it home — and make them want to bring you back

After you have sold yourself by demonstrating that you are the best candidate for the job, bring it home — again, briefly. Reiterate your interest in and excitement about the possibility of working for this employer, note that your resume is attached and indicate that you are available to provide any additional information or answer any questions they may have. Finally, thank them for considering your application.


Revise, rewrite, and then get a second opinion (or third) opinion on your cover letter

When you’ve completed your engineering cover letter and are happy with it, set it aside. Don't look at it for an hour or two, or even sleep on it. Only then, reread it — then rewrite it. Find a better way to say what you have said. Once you’re convinced that you’ve composed the perfect letter, show it to a colleague you trust (whether or not they’re an engineer themselves). Ask them if they would ask you in for an interview based on the letter, or if they have any ideas on how to punch it up or shorten it. Listen, then make changes where needed. Here at TeamGlobal, our experts dedicate a good deal of their time to going over cover letters and identifying both their strong and weak points.


Consider asking a professional for help

The aerospace and engineering job markets are highly competitive. Give yourself an advantage by working with a staffing service that has extensive experience matching engineering firms’ needs with the highly skilled individuals who can meet those needs. At TeamGlobal, we’ve been doing just that for over 25 years. Let us help you find your dream job in engineering. Don't go it alone — start your engineering job search with TeamGlobal today.

Top Jobs in Aerospace

Posted September 26, 2018

The aerospace industry is growing once again and is expected to continue to do so in solid, steady fashion over the next decade. The number of job opportunities for aerospace engineers and aircraft maintenance and modification personnel in the aerospace industry is also rising — as are pay rates. Luckily, TeamGlobal has over a quarter of a century of experience in meeting the staffing needs of both the ambitious startups and the established corporations active in the aerospace industry.


Top Jobs in Aerospace

The aerospace industry has not only recovered from the slump that followed the financial collapse of 2008, but it also continues to grow at a very healthy rate. The industry needs aerospace engineers, aeronautical engineers and other workers to design, build and repair military aircraft, commercial aircraft, missiles, anti-missile defense systems and even vessels that can stand up to the rigors of space travel. That last category includes not only satellites and space stations (as well as the rockets to launch them), but also vehicles capable of carrying cargo and passengers into low-earth orbit and beyond.

Across the board, the industry needs highly skilled employees. TeamGlobal is just the organization to help aerospace engineers and other aircraft maintenance professionals find the right fit, with the right company, and at the right pay rate. For many, working in the aerospace industry itself is a dream come true, and TeamGlobal can help aerospace professionals find their dream job.


The Big Picture in Aerospace: More Jobs

The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently revised upwards its moderately bleak 2014 prediction that aerospace jobs would decline by 2.3 percent over the decade ending in 2024. It now predicts a 6 percent growth rate in aerospace employment between now and 2026. Currently, there are approximately 70,000 aerospace engineers working in the United States alone. Many of these individuals are baby boomers who are fast approaching retirement age. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that not only will the aerospace industry fill jobs left vacant by retirees, but also will add about 4,200 new aerospace engineering jobs over the next eight years.

In a recent article in Aviation Week & Space Technology (Sept 3 – 16, 2018), the need for aviation maintenance technicians is on the rise. Over the next 20 years, the need for NEW aircraft maintenance and modification technicians to provide maintenance to commercial, business aviation and helicopter fleets in the United States alone is estimated to be 189,000 technicians.


Aerospace Engineering Wages Are on the Rise

While wages for most workers have been and are expected to remain stagnant or even fall in relation to inflation and the cost of living, those of workers in the aerospace industry have continued to trend into positive territory. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2014 median annual pay for aerospace engineers was $107,000. Today it is over $113,000. Hourly wages for aerospace engineers topped $54 in 2016, and are continuing to rise.


Major Players in Aerospace Predict More Growth, More Jobs

One reason wages have risen is that the major players in the aerospace industry are expanding, and expect to continue to expand over the next decade. In 2017, for example, Airbus delivered a record 718 aircraft to 85 customers and took orders for over 1,100 new aircraft. Lockheed Martin reports a similar rise in military aircraft demand, notably in Generation 4.5 fighter aircraft. Many other major aircraft manufacturers report similar levels of growth, especially as customers who delayed replacing aging planes in the years immediately following the Great Recession are now placing orders to do so.

That means more positions that need to be filled, which leads to companies competing with each other to hire newly minted aerospace engineers and maintenance technicians, retain their own aerospace engineers and maintenance technicians, and hire away the best talent from their competitors. Those competitors, moreover, are no longer just the traditional big names in the aerospace industry or governments, but also new players on the field — the privately funded spaceflight companies.


Privately Funded Space Flight Companies

The government and the big aerospace corporations are no longer the only players in the field. Space X, Blue Origin and other privately funded spaceflight and satellite companies need aerospace engineers. As more such companies enter the field, this will increase the demand for aerospace professionals in all fields, from aerospace design and manufacturing to aerospace technicians. These companies need experts to work on the design, production, launching and management of satellites and other space vehicles, and they are willing to pay premium salaries to lure experienced people in the aerospace industry to work for them.


A Bright Future for Aerospace Engineers

Industry analysts predict that the aerospace industry will continue to grow over the next decade. The Teal Group, for example, expects deliveries will be 9 percent higher in 2018 than in 2017. Low interest rates, increasing demand and positive airline traffic growth are helping to drive and maintain momentum. These factors are also helping to make up for the relatively flat rate of growth in the business jets and military transport sectors. Growth is also high in the satellite and other space vehicle fields.


TeamGlobal: Over 25Years of Providing Premier Contract and Direct Hire Staffing in the Aerospace Industry

All of this is welcome news to both experienced and budding aerospace engineers, but also means that there are so many opportunities that might go unnoticed, such as in the trades of maintenance, avionics, sheetmetal,painting, cabinetry and upholstery. That’s where TeamGlobal can help. TeamGlobal specializes in recruiting and placing aerospace and aviation maintenance and completion professionals, and in providing commercial aviation, corporate and government aerospace enterprises with the top aerospace engineers and other aerospace professionals they need. Since 1989, TeamGlobal has been providing intelligent solutions for corporate and government staffing needs — and helping talented individuals find their dream job in the aerospace industry.

Whether you’re an aircraft planner, assembly technician, electrical technician, avionics technician, mechanical engineer, licensed aircraft inspector or CNC machinist, if you’re looking to advance in your aerospace career, contact a TeamGlobal recruiter today.

TeamGlobal's Parent Company Aquires OpenALPR

Posted: September 24th, 2018

Disruptive Artificial Intelligence-based Software Application Enables Automated License Plate Reading Using Nearly Any IP Camera System

CHANTILLY, VA / ACCESSWIRE / September 20, 2018 / Novume Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ: NVMM) a holding company that integrates technology and human capital to solve complex client challenges in today's world, announced today that effective September 17, 2018, it entered into a binding letter of intent with OpenALPR Technology, Inc. (OpenALPR). The letter of intent sets forth the parties' intent for Novume to acquire the assets of OpenALPR. OpenALPR is a privately-held Boston, Massachusetts-based company that is internationally recognized as a leading provider of automated license plate reader (LPR) technology used by both law enforcement and commercial clients.

Brekford Traffic Safety, Inc. (Brekford), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Novume, has been working with OpenALPR since February 2018 to incorporate OpenALPR's technology into Brekford's products and services. Brekford is a leading public safety service provider.

OpenALPR's software is currently running on over 2,000 cameras, capturing millions of license plates per day, that are operated by more than 400 clients in over 20 countries. Recent OpenALPR assignments include incorporating its software with approximately 1,000 fixed cameras as part of a city-wide surveillance project in one of Mexico's largest urban areas. OpenALPR's software is also being piloted for use by one of the world's largest fast food companies to enhance their customers' drive-thru experience. A Fortune 20 company is also evaluating the software to streamline logistics by matching tractor and trailer license plates as shipments move between the client's distribution centers.

This transaction is subject to closing conditions, including satisfactory completion of due diligence, entry into definitive agreements, approval of the transaction by Novume's board of directors and consummation of a financing transaction.

"OpenALPR is a game changer within the LPR industry, providing unparalleled accuracy of reads not only for license plates, but also instantaneous identification of vehicle make, model and color. More importantly, it can be deployed to work with existing camera technology infrastructures in both law enforcement and commercial channels," said Robert Berman, Novume's CEO.

Matt Hill, OpenALPR's CEO, said "We're enthusiastic to join forces with Novume in expanding their law enforcement and government support capabilities. OpenALPR delivers best-in-class solutions for LPR, by leveraging dramatic advancements in artificial intelligence-based software development. We are also excited about LPR growth potential in commercial channels such as private security, logistics, and retail, where we have recently made some significant inroads." Rod Hillman, Brekford's President, said "OpenALPR has proven to be the perfect fit for our Argos Guardian Move Over Camera™ and has important applications for our installed base of automated speed and red-light camera systems in the US and Canada."

The acquisition is also expected to provide applications for other Novume subsidiaries. "Equally exciting is the potential for the existing business development units within our subsidiaries to offer OpenALPR's technology and solutions to a wide variety of government, private industry and education clients and to take advantage of OpenALPR's proven capabilities in the area of artificial intelligence. We are thrilled to integrate the OpenALPR team within the Novume family of companies," said Berman.

Additional information regarding the transaction is available in our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on September 20, 2018, which is available on the SEC Filings page of the Novume website. About OpenALPR Technology, Inc.

OpenALPR builds software that enables automatic license plate and vehicle recognition through virtually any IP camera. Its industry-leading artificial intelligence-based solutions can be hosted locally or in the cloud. Combined with its robust and growing license plate database covering 60 countries, OpenALPR's software can identify in real time vehicle license plate data, color, make, model and body type.


About Novume Solutions, Inc.

Novume™ provides products and services to government and private sector clients, with an emphasis on public safety, risk management and workforce solutions. We are a holding company that integrates technology and human capital to solve complex client challenges in today's world. We provide Solutions for a New Generation™.


Forward-Looking Statements

This press release includes statements concerning Novume Solutions, Inc. and its future expectations, plans and prospects that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For this purpose, any statements that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as "may," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "could," "intends," "target," "projects," "contemplates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential," or "continue," by the negative of these terms or by other similar expressions. You are cautioned that such statements are subject to many risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events, or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks that actual circumstances, events or results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, particularly as a result of various risks and other factors identified in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date on which they were made and are based on management's assumptions and estimates as of such date. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of the receipt of new information, the occurrence of future events, or otherwise.


Contact Riaz Latifullah EVP Corporate Development info@novume.com
SOURCE: Novume Solutions, Inc.

We are TeamGlobal!

Posted: July 23rd, 2018

Global Technical Services and Global Contract Professionals (Global Family of Staffing Companies) will now be collectively known as TeamGlobal. Working with TeamGlobal, our clients, field employees, and candidates will experience a total team effort providing them the best human capital resources. This total team effort will create an unique and unforgettable experience in our industry!


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